NASA Reviled Supernova Morphs and Shock Waves Through a Video

NASA Reviled Supernova Morphs and Shock Waves Through a Video

NASA released a new video that reveals how supernova morphs and moves over 13 years.

Cassiopeia A, also called Cas A, as the debris field is already known, was generated after a star’s explosion in 1680, based on the space agency.

The shock waves in blue could be seen as they pulse via space in the information collected within 2000 and 2013 by NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory.

“As the blast wave travels outwards at speeds of about 11 million miles per hour, it encounters surrounding materials and slows down, generating a second shock wave,” Chandra mission personnel stated in a statement.

This “reverse shock,” the agency stated, “travels backward, similar to how a traffic jam travels backward from the scene of an accident on a highway.”

Based on Space.com, Cas A was the first object that Chandra noticed not long after it launched out to space on July 23, 1999.

NASA noted that other observations from Chandra through the years have proven among the elements essential for life in the explosion and have produced 3D models of the supernova remnant.

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